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MP3 Paul Beaton - This is the Hunter

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The Cinema
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The Hunters Funeral Procession
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Peaches
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Charlie Zombiewalk
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Late
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Ladysmith Black Mambazo Does Not Run From Aliens
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House Bunyip
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Thats Hollywood For You
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No. 17
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Size: 9 MB   - internal.php - Platform: MP3

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Description:

(ID 109238518)
Paul is a ridiculous looking person and a consistent disgrace to society but his music is kind of fun and by listening to it you'll probably end up saving the rainforest or maybe a few small things in the regular forest.

9 MP3 Songs in this album (27:19) !
Related styles: Rock: Instrumental Rock, Pop: with Electronic Production, Type: Instrumental

People who are interested in Summun crazy should consider this download.


Details:
All music written and recorded by Paul Beaton
All artwork conceived and drawn by Eden Biggin

The Cinema
I had a specific cinema in mind when I wrote this. It was one of those one-picture cinemas that seats about 50 people and only changes movies every month or so, based on some managerial decision that Iâm not aware of. It was called Westdale Theatre and it was the kind of cinema that had tab curtains on the stage and embroidering on the walls and velvet plush seats. I thought it would be nice to watch silent films there less THX sound set fire to the zillions of fabrics adorning the room. Anyways, Iâve always loved cinemas like that. If I could live in one I would.
I got lucky enough when I was playing around with synth sounds for this song that I should find a patch called âCinematic Pianoâ. It was a perfect fit.

The Hunterâs Funeral Procession
The main bass riff here is taken from the third movement of Mahlerâs Symphony No. 1. I read on Wikipedia that he got the inspiration for this movement from a wood cut by Moritz Schwind, which depicted a group of animals about to bury their hunter, and lifted the tune from Frere Jacques. I remember the night I got back from hearing this symphony for the first time (performed by some of the best and brightest musicians me and you and your cousin will ever hear: the Toronto Symphony Orchestra) and friggin rocking out on bass all night long to it. It was so fantastic and catchy and kind of ghastly I just couldnât stop playing it. I wrote the harmonies sometime later.

Peaches
I wrote the guitar riff into a MIDI program and didnât give two shits about it for the longest time. I would revisit it and add a little ditty here and there and it was slowly growing into something I could stand. Then when I first got my Korg M3 I played a random riff into it withouth thinking twice about what I was playing and that riff happened to be the guitar riff in this song. And it sounded pretty awesome. So I kept working away at it. A nutty piano part came to me, I stole a riff from Flight of the Conchordsâ Mutha Uckas, and I finally got to say yes damn I like this song. So I called it Peaches because sometimes peaches are shit and sometimes theyâre good but if you spend enough time with peaches youâll probably end up liking them. I was pleased with myself that I was able to turn something that I wasnât too excited about into something I could really get behind.
Oh, the Mutha Uckas part is no longer in the song. So I wonât be sued for copyright infringement just yet. I did use it for another song that I want to release soon so weâll see what happens with that.

Late
This is modelled off of Carly Comandoâs Late. One Take is my kind of CD. I first heard it when I was in New York on family vacation and it instantly became my soundtrack to Manhattan and the soundtrack to my view of the city from that cold distant balcony off the W hotel. I used to listen to the CD over and over again and think that if the rest of those people down there could hear what I was hearing then New York wouldn't be as crowded as it is. Everyone would move to the suburbs and look back at the city like the relic that it's never been fully appreciated for and probably eventually encase the whole thing in glass. But then if they did that I wouldn't be able to make it there one day so I better not share it with them. Fuckers.
I got home and did a terrible job of transcribing the song, but ended up stumbling upon this riff.

Ladysmith Black Mambazo Does Not Run From Aliens
I got this title from an SNL extra features segment, in The Best Of Saturday TV Funhouse, where Robert Smigel is interviewing Ladysmith Black Mambazo during a sketch. The extra features segment entailed watching the sketch as it ran normally, as Smigel interviewed celebrity guests and got anecdotes that would interest people whoâs fandom of the show needs to be dialled back a notch. It was a hell of an interview. Robert Smigel couldnât get a solid answer out of anyone in the band as most of them were in the background singing and generally being awesome. I can just picture him running around and trying to ask question after question and they would break off into small circles and start snapping their fingers and making beautiful harmonies. Repeat process.
I remember that somebody finally chimed in when he saw that the cartoon had the band running from aliens. He said something along the lines of, âitâs a great sketch, but hereâs where you go wrong. We would not run from the aliens. We are strong men.â I really wish I had seen the look on Smigelâs face. The best part was, as Robert Smigel continued to bring on celebrity guests and interview them, you could STILL hear LBM in the background. Doing what they do.
Anyways, this trend started a long and horrible habit for me: I was starting to title my riffs off of what was going on around me, and not making titles based on the feeling I got from the song. I guess itâs lazy or whatever you choose to call it, but I realized that those random phrases worked as memory anchors for me. I can always look back on these odd statements and remember what I was doing at that time and what was distracting me from writing everything I had to write. So I decided to be selfish and keep the titles as they are.

House Bunyip
House Bunyip was the first track I recorded for this album and I can honestly say it was originally going to be a house beat to the likes of what you hear in the back alley clubs off Richmond. Like Ladysmith the title came from a random thing in the room that I looked at while writing it (a Wikipedia page on the Bunyip, in the other tab in my browser). Like I said I felt like I was naming too many of my songs based on my current surroundings and not actually taking the time to think up a suitable title so I decided to meet myself halfway and call it House Bunyip, a throw-back to those old âHouse Hippoâ commercials from when I was a kid.

Thatâs Hollywood For You
Thatâs not Hollywood for you. This was originally the poppiest riff I had ever made, until I went through my great reverb phase. I always wanted reverb that would throw you into this ocean of sound. Nobody hears the notes when you do that. They hear the thud of the strongest noise and the dominance of the fringe of the song's presence, and that's the presence that raises the song to a greater tide. Precision was not my game back then.
It was a short-lived phase but out of it came this song, and the realization that I could make fun pop songs into foreboding pop songs. And then foreboding pop songs into Thatâs Hollywood For You

No. 17
The outro is an excerpt from Beethovenâs Piano Sonata No. 17, the best song that was ever written. When I first heard that sonata I told myself that if I ever wrote something that even remotely resembled it then that would be that and I would be forced to write music for the rest of my life whether I wanted to or not.
The rest of the song took me about three days to write... I remember that I took a few days off school to hang around my apartment in my underwear and watch SNL and Futurama. Because I had a lot of catching up to do with my DVDs and a lot of dirty laundry. So I would sleep 14 hours a day, drink my birthday scotch, and watch TV: making my way to the piano only during particularly good music acts on SNL. Occasionally I would walk over to the window and check up on the people in the fitness studio above the Starbucks across the street from me. I would wave to them and spit scotch on my window and they would look back at me with a disgusting guffaw. It was sort of like that look you give a monkey when he points his pecker up at his face and pees on himself, then glances at you in hopes youâll continue the conversation. Well I didnât mind. I was in the middle of writing my favourite song in the world, and plus I could catch them when they went downstairs to the Starbucks for a post-workout scone and say Hi then. The jam before the outro is something Iâm currently striving for. Every instrument is doing something completely different but together they construct the song by building from the poles. I think more than anything this is what Iâll sound like in the future.



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