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The Teaching Of Jesus - Know What Did Really Jesus Teach Us

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THE TEACHING OF JESUS

The Teaching Of Jesus is for the serious searcher of gospel truth. It proves that several pieces of Christ's messages and miracles are missing from the Bible. 
Non-dogmatic, non sectarian it reconstructs both public and disciple teachings with references from the old Testament. 
In essence, it patches up all the major teachings of Christ which are of great benefit to man but had been either deleted or gone amiss from the Bible.

Contents
I

INTRODUCTORY

Luke xxiv. 19. "A prophet mighty in word before God and all the people."

John iii. 2. "A teacher come from God." 

II

CONCERNING GOD

John xvii. 11. "Holy Father."

III

CONCERNING HIMSELF

Matthew xvi. 15. "Who say ye that I am?" 

IV

CONCERNING HIS OWN DEATH

Mark x. 45. "The Son of Man came ... to give His life a ransom for many." 

V

CONCERNING THE HOLY SPIRIT

John xiv. 16. "I will pray the Father, and He shall give you another Comforter, that He may be with you for ever, even the Spirit of truth."

John xvi. 7. "It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I go away, I will send Him unto you." 

VI

CONCERNING THE KINGDOM OF GOD

Matthew vi. 10. "Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so on earth." 

VII

CONCERNING MAN

Luke xv. 10. "There is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth." 

VIII

CONCERNING SIN

Luke xi. 2, 4. "When ye pray, say,... Forgive us our sins." 

IX

CONCERNING RIGHTEOUSNESS

Matthew vi. 33. "Seek ye first ... His righteousness." 

X

CONCERNING PRAYER

Matthew vii. 9-11. "What man is there of you, who, if his son shall ask him for a loaf, will give him a stone; or if he shall ask for a fish, will give him a serpent? If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask Him?" 

XI

CONCERNING THE FORGIVENESS OF INJURIES

Matthew xviii. 21, 22. "Then came Peter, and said to Him, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? until seven times? Jesus saith unto him, I say not unto thee, until seven times; but, until seventy times seven." 

XII

CONCERNING CARE

Matthew vi. 25, 31, 34. "Be not anxious for your life ... nor yet for your body. ... Be not anxious, saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we drink? ... Be not anxious for the morrow." 

XIII

CONCERNING MONEY

Luke xviii. 24, 25. "How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God! For it is easier for a camel to enter in through a needle's eye, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God." 

XIV

CONCERNING THE SECOND ADVENT

Matthew xxiv. 30, 36. "They shall see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory.... Of that day and hour knoweth no one, not even the angels of heaven, neither the Son, but the Father only."

XV

CONCERNING THE JUDGMENT

Matthew xxv. 31-33. "When the Son of Man shall come in His glory, and all the angels with Him, then shall He sit on the throne of His glory: and before Him shall be gathered all the nations: and He shall separate them one from another, as the shepherd separateth the sheep from the goats: and He shall set the sheep on His right hand, but the goats on the left."

XVI

CONCERNING THE FUTURE LIFE

Matthew vi. 20. "Where neither moth nor rust doth consume, and where thieves do not break through nor steal."

Mark ix. 48. "Where their worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched."


Book Excerpts:
In harmony with what has been already said in the previous chapter, concerning Christ's manner and method as a teacher, we shall find little or nothing defined, formal, systematic in Christ's teaching on this subject. 
In those theological handbooks which piloted some of us through the troublous waters of our early theological thinking, one chapter is always occupied with proofs, more or less elaborate, of the existence of God, and another with a discussion of what are termed the Divine "attributes." And for the purposes of a theological handbook doubtless this is the right course to take. 
But this was not Christ's way. Search the four Gospels through, and probably not one verse can be found which by itself would serve as a suitable definition for any religious catechism or theological textbook. Christ, we must remember, did not, in His teaching, begin de novo. 
He never forgot that He was speaking to a people whose were the law and the prophets and the fathers; throughout He assumed and built upon the accepted truths of Old Testament revelation. To have addressed elaborate arguments in proof of the existence of God to the Jews would have been a mere waste of words; for that faith was the very foundation of their national life. Nor did Christ speak about the "attributes" of God. 
Again that was not His way. He chose to speak in the concrete rather than in the abstract, and, therefore, instead of defining God, He shows us how He acts. In parable, in story, and in His own life He sets God before us, that so we may learn what He is, and how He feels toward us.

Christ, I say, built upon the foundation of the Old Testament. To understand, therefore, the true significance of His teaching about God, we must first of all put ourselves at the point of view of a devout Jew of His day, and see how far he had been brought by that earlier revelation which Christ took up and carried to completion. What, then, did the Jews know of God before Christ came?

They knew that God is One, Only, Sovereign: "Hear, O Israel, the Lord our God is one God." It had been a hard lesson for Israel to learn. Centuries had passed before the nation had been purged of its idolatries. But the cleansing fires had done their work at last, and perhaps the world has never seen sterner monotheists than were the Pharisees of the time of Christ.
And He whom thus they worshipped as Sovereign they knew also to be holy: "The Holy One of Israel," "exalted in righteousness." True, Pharisaism had degraded the lofty conceptions of the great Hebrew prophets; it had taught men to think of God as caring more for the tithing of mint, and anise, and cumin than for the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith, making morality merely an affair of ceremonies, instead of the concern of the heart and the life. 
But, however Jewish teachers might blind themselves and deceive their disciples, the Jewish Scriptures still remained to testify of God and righteousness, and of the claims which a righteous God makes upon His people: "Wash you, make you clean; put away the evil of your doings from before Mine eyes; cease to do evil; learn to do well." 
Nor, accustomed though we are to think of the God of the Old Testament as stern rather than kind, were the tenderer elements wanting from the Jewish conception of Deity. Illustration is not now possible, but a very little thought will remind us that it is to the Hebrew psalmists and prophets that we owe some of the most gracious and tender imagery of the Divine love with which the language of devotion has ever been enriched.
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